Gathering Graveyard dirt.

This weekend, my boyfriend and I visited the cemetery again, to collect graveyard dirt for me and Earthdragon. I felt strongly that I should get from a female grave, and finally settled on a young girl who died at the age of two years and  9 months. I parted with thanks…coins and white daisies.

Earthdragon and I also went to the crossroads to bury a baby bird, bury a curse and to collect more crossroads dirt. There were three crossroads in a row, and it felt really powerful. The curse was one I had done last year, which I mentioned in a blog, since varsity is over and the threat was removed, I needed to bury it to earth it. As thanks to the crossroads spirits for letting us have some soil, we left some coins.

I remember when I first started practicing the craft, taking gravedirt would have seemed a bit odd, not to mention, I was a bit scared of  “bad ghosts” due to my childhood experiences in the old house.

The last time Earthdragon and I collected graveyard dirt, the spirit followed us home, but did not harm us in any way, she was merely curious.

I don’t feel anything wrong with asking help from spirits, or attempting to have a relationship with them, most of them are really not harmful, they are just living their lives in another plane, that co-exists with ours, some spirits may have moved on, but their energy still remains, in the soil and the plants that grow in it. One should always be respectful and ask before taking dirt from a grave, If I receive negative feelings, then I know the answer is no, if I get positive feelings, I know the answer is yes, if I get no feelings, I leave it and wait for another time. A gift should always be left, whether it is coins, flowers, or energy, or even cleaning up the grave and tidying up the cemetery when you can.

Gravedirt from a child is useful for any good work, children are pure, like animals. Never use this dirt for anything like cursing, banishing, harming, or any negative working. Dirt gathered from a child’s grave can often be used in friendship spells.

Upon entering a cemetery one should obviously make sure of any protocol, like no photo’s, and open hours. Other important  protocols, is to ask entrance of the graveyard spirit, both Hekate and Anubis are associated with cemeteries so I ask them permission to enter, and when it is granted I make my way through the cemetery. I often leave flowers at the graves of children, or to someone I feel needs it. Upon leaving, a gift and thanks should be left, often flowers, rum, or coins are good payment upon leaving.

Crossroads gatherings are done in a similar way, I ask permission from a crossroads spirit, Hekate or Papa Legba, and leave with a gift of thanks, often coins or tobacco.

Dorothy Morrison gives a breakdown of correspondences for gravedirt gathered from certain graves(Utterly Wicked:Curses, Hexes and other Unsavory Notions p32) some of these I’ll include here paraphrased:

Adolescent (Ages11-19): To cause inattentiveness and irresponsible behavior, to stir interest in another person, cause romantic involvement, sexual attraction and increase sexual prowess.

Child (Ages 2-10): innocence, developing friendships, to obtain basic necessities.

Doctor: To heal or cause illness

Executed/murdered: justice, revenge, to cause harm

Lawyer/Judge: winning a court case, receiving a settlement

Magical practitioner: anything

Pet: protection, loyalty

Soldier: Can be used for nearly everything, make sure they would not have had cross-purposes to your working

Nun/Priest: personal spiritual protection, to convey innocence and goodness

Never use the dirt of a murderer or rapist, this is my personal warning and opinion, it’s bad, bad, bad, these spirits are not evolved, they can cause death and some serious repercussions for the user of such dirt can ensue, the problems by far outweigh the benefits.

 

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